Color psychology in the workplace

 photo source: Kimball Brand

photo source: Kimball Brand

Color is a powerful tool when creating a space. Even the smallest amount can make all the difference. When it comes to color for the workplace, it is important to keep in mind that color greatly affects human emotion + behavior.

“If you’re hoping to make your workers more productive, or you want to encourage shoppers to spend money, understanding the basics of color psychology can help you design a space that will maximize your potential.” - Amy Morin

Green

Green is said to spark creativity which can help employees be more productive. Most people associate green with nature + re-growth which seems to have a positive impact. A collaboration area would be a great place for some greenery.

 Photography by Sona Manukyan & Ani Avagyan

Photography by Sona Manukyan & Ani Avagyan

Pink

Many people associate the color pink with all things feminine and “girly”. Certain shades of pink are described as relaxing + calming. However, when it comes to the brighter, more vibrant shades, it can be stimulating + sometimes even aggravating. It has even been said that pink can also be energy draining. Although some shades may be calming, psychologists have found that this only happens within the initial contact of the color. After becoming more accustomed to the color, people can become agitated.


Red

Red is a very vibrant color. Although research indicates that red can be helpful if you’re trying to attract a mate, it isn’t helpful if you need to stay on task. When we see the color red, our reactions become faster + more forceful. Some might argue that red provides boosts of energy, but that energy is likely shortly lived and can ultimately reduce analytical thinking. Red is also a very physical color. With that being said, the color red would be best used in an area that requires physical movement.

 photo source: Apostrophy’s Office in Thailand from designboom

photo source: Apostrophy’s Office in Thailand from designboom



Blue

The most well-liked color is…you guessed it, blue. Blue has a calming effect on most people. Blue is seen as a loyal + trustworthy color. That is why most insurance + finance logos are blue. This color would best work in the places in the office that require focus + mental strain.

 photo source: Google’s London Office

photo source: Google’s London Office

Yellow
The color yellow is bright + intense which can invoke strong, emotional feelings. It is generally viewed as a warm color, but can be visually abrasive if overused. Yellow is also not the most loved color. The ones who do like yellow love it + those who do not are overwhelmed by it.

 photo source: Joe Fletcher; Garcia Tamjidi Architecture in California

photo source: Joe Fletcher; Garcia Tamjidi Architecture in California

Whether you’re choosing a new paint color for your office or designing a new space for a client, it is important to keep in mind your color choices + how they can help you maximize your potential.





Sources

  1. http://www.contemporist.com/interior-design-idea-use-color-to-define-an-area/

  2. https://www.forbes.com/sites/amymorin/2014/02/04/how-to-use-color-psychology-to-give-your-business-an-edge/#1226319d170a

  3. https://www.verywellmind.com/the-color-psychology-of-pink-2795819

  4. https://www.verywellmind.com/the-color-psychology-of-yellow-2795823